Interdisciplinary Approaches for Control of Large‐scale Complex Systems:
Latest Development and Future Trends

June 27‐29 2018, Milwaukee, WI USA

About the Workshop

Efficient operation and effective protection of critical infrastructures such as electric power grid, water/gas supply network, transportation system and etc. are essential to ensure America’s security and prosperity, and thus have the top priority in national research agenda. These infrastructure systems are becoming increasingly large, complex, dynamic, heterogeneous, dispersed and behavioral. Moreover, different infrastructure systems are becoming more and more interconnected and interdependent. This trend has imposed very significant challenges on the corresponding control design to achieve efficient operation and effective protection of these critical infrastructures.

On the one hand, these systems have been growing to be so complex for conventional control approaches to achieve efficient system operation. First of all, centralized control could become intractable very easily for large‐scale systems, and is subject to technical issues such as poor scalability and low reliability. Second, physics‐based system modeling becomes very difficult due to the interconnection between various system components, and is usually insufficient to describe the complex system dynamics in a satisfactory manner. Last but not the least, the human‐machine interactions in these systems introduce another layer of uncertainties, and exacerbate the issues associated with physics‐based modeling. Furthermore, the control design without taking into account human behaviors is also difficult to achieve the social efficiency of these systems during real‐time operation.

On the other hand, the extensive deployment of advanced information and communications technologies (ICT) for control support in these systems has introduced various new issues. The effects introduced by imperfect communication such as network delay and packet drop could significantly degrade the control performance if not properly considered during the control design. In addition, the geographical distribution of system components and the use of ICT have exposed these systems to new security risks because they are inherently vulnerable to cyberphysical attacks. Thus, it is important to design attack‐resilient control to achieve effective system protection against malicious threats.

Although they are serious, these challenges also present opportunities for us to rethink the control design for efficient operation and effective protection of critical infrastructure. Various interdisciplinary approaches such as distributed optimization, data science, microeconomics, and encryption have been recently proposed to address these challenges. This workshop intends to bring together leading researchers from both universities and national laboratories to discuss the technical obstacles, present their latest solutions and share their views of the future trends regarding interdisciplinary control for critical infrastructures. It is designed to be accessible to a broad controls audience, and will be particularly useful for beginning graduate students interested in working in the area of control.

Organizers:

  • Dr. Jianming Lian

      Optimization and Control Group, Energy and Environment Directorate
      Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354
      Phone: +1 (509) 372‐4504
      Email: Jianming.lian@pnnl.gov

  • Dr. Tao Yang

      Electrical Engineering
      University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203
      Phone: +1 (940) 891‐6876
      Email: tao.yang@unt.edu

Speakers:

  • Dr. Somayeh Sojoudi  (University of California at Berkeley) : Data‐Driven Methods for Learning Complex Networks. [web]
  • Dr. Na Li (Harvard University): Limited Communication Gradient Methods for Distributed Resource Allocation Optimization. [web]
  • Dr. Le Xie (Texas A&M University): Streaming Analytics of Dynamic Data in Smart Grid: A Tale of Two Time Scales. [web]
  • Dr. Mihailo Jovanovic (University of Southern California): The Proximal Augmented Lagrangian Method for Nonsmooth and Distributed Optimization. [web]
  • Dr. Minghui Zhu (The Pennsylvania State University): A Control‐Theoretic Perspective on Cyber‐Physical Privacy. [web]
  • Dr. Wei Zhang (The Ohio State University): An Optimization Perspective on Mean-Field Games for Large-Scale Cyber-Physical Systems. [web]
  • Dr. Yingchen Zhang (National Renewable Energy Laboratory): Predictive Data Analytics for Enhanced Observability and Controllability at Grid Edge. [web]
  • Dr. Tao Yang (University of North Texas): Distributed Finite-Time Optimization. [web]
  • Dr. Jianming Lian (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory): Demystifying Transactive Energy System: Glossary, Principle and Application. [web]

The registration page is https://css.paperplaza.net/registration/index.php

We look forward to seeing you in Milwaukee!

Schedule:

  • 9:00 – 9:05

      Welcome

  • 9:05 – 9:35

      Dr. Somayeh Sojoudi

      Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley

      Title: Data-Driven Methods for Learning Complex Networks

  • 9:40 – 10:10

      Dr. Le Xie

      Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A&M University

      Title: Streaming Analytics of Dynamic Data in Smart Grid: A Tale of Two Time Scales

  • 10:15 – 10:45

      Morning break

  • 10:45 – 11:15

      Dr. Mihailo Jovanovic

      Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California

      Title: The Proximal Augmented La0grangian Method for Nonsmooth and Distributed Optimization

  • 11:20 – 11:50

      Dr. Minghui Zhu

      Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University

      Title: A Control-Theoretic Perspective on Cyber-Physical Privacy

  • 11:50 – 13:30

      Lunch break

  • 13:30 – 14:00

      Dr. Yingchen Zhang

      National Renewable National Laboratory 

      Title: Predictive Data Analytics for Enhanced Observability and Controllability at Grid Edge

  • 14:05 – 14:35

      Dr. Wei Zhang

      Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University

      Title: An Optimization Perspective on Mean-Field Games for Large-Scale Cyber-Physical Systems

  • 14:40 – 15:10

      Afternoon Break

  • 15:10 – 15:40

      Dr. Na Li

      Electrical Engineering, Harvard University

      Title: Limited Communication Gradient Methods for Distributed Resource Allocation Optimization

  • 15:45 – 16:15

      Dr. Tao Yang

      Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas

      Title: Distributed Finite-Time Optimization

  • 16:20 – 16:50

      Dr. Jianming Lian

      Optimization and Control Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

      Title: Demystifying Transactive Energy System: Glossary, Principle and Application

  • 16:55 – 17:30

      Wrap-up and discussion